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Saturday, 2 November 2013

Vehicle Dynamics III: Vertical oscillations

By Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Martin Meywerk - Professor for Automotive Engineering at the Helmut-Schmidt-University in Hamburg

From Bugatti Veyron to Volkswagen Beetle, from racing to passenger car: Learn how they behave on a country road and on the autobahn!

About this course
The mobility has influenced many areas of a human's life since the invention of the wheel. While, in the early days of motorized vehicles, technical developments concentrated on simple mechanical or electrical issues , in the past decades, the electronics and with it, the microprocessor technology have become a central part of innovation in vehicles. Future developments of trendsetting style will be the conversion of the drive train from purely internal combustion engine to hybrid or alternative powertrain systems, the car-to-car communication and the autonomous vehicles. Challenges that make these technical developments partly necessary, come from a desirable reduction in CO2 emissions and an increase in the active safety. To understand the recent developments, especially in the field of alternative propulsion strategies and also in the area of autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicles, a knowledge of the basic driving physics is essential, as these innovations can be understood solely as the underlying laws of physics are known.
For this reason three parts of the vehicle dynamics, the longitudinal, the lateral and the vertical dynamics are important.
Vertical oscillations
In this third part vertical dynamic aspects of vehicles will be illuminated, that means, we will describe a car running on a bumpy or rough street.
We will start with an survey of suspensions and springs and dampers. After this we will explain the description of rough streets and we will give an introduction to Fourier integrals. Then we will have a closer look at vertical models, and in the last fundamental part we will describe the conflict between driving Safety and comfort. The course will be finished by two applications from automotive mechatronics.
Course Structure
  1. Suspensions
  2. Springs, Dampers
  3. Stochastic Description of Road Surfaces
  4. Fourier Integrals
  5. Vertical Models
  6. Conflict Between Driving Safety and Comfort
  7. Application: Active Body Control
  8. Application: Active Stabilizing Rod
Learning Outcomes
  • You will know different kinds of suspensions, springs and dampers
  • You will know the description of rough and bumpy streets
  • You understand the Fourier integral
  • You understand the conflict between driving safety and comfort
  • You are able to calculate simple properties of a car
Workload
Per week: 135 - 260 min.
  • one video divided in 5 to 7 portions: 45 min.
  • 5 – 7 question-clusters for knowledge: 20 -30 min.
  • 2 – 3 question-clusters for comprehension: 25 – 50 min.
  • Guided calculation for application
  • P2P-problems to train analysis and synthesis skills: 45 min.
  • wrap-up: 0 – 90 min. (depends on your previous knowledge and your comprehension) Preparation of the exam: 30 h
Course Format
The course uses a mixture of Screencasts (with handwritten derivations, drawings, formulas), Powerpoint slides and videos from real cars, simulated cars and testrigs.
Assessments
To assess the different levels of learning this course will use different form of assessments:
  • Knowledge: Multiple choice,
  • Comprehension: correlation between statements and parts of diagrams, formulas or driving maneuver (visualized by short simulation videos);
  • Application: short guided calculations (open office),
  • Analysis: P2P-problems: longer calculations or drawings
Prior Knowledge
You should have been successful in university courses in basic mathematics and in basic engineering mechanics, especially you need:
  • Algebra
  • Trigonometric Functions
  • Differential calculus
  • Linear Algebra: Vectors, Coordinate systems etc.
  • Force, Torque, Equilibrium
  • Mass, Center of Gravity, Moment of Inertia
  • Method of Sections, Friction, Newton's Law
  • (Fourier’s integral)

Vehicle Dynamics II: Cornering

By Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Martin Meywerk ,Helmut-Schmidt-Universit├Ąt - Universit├Ąt der Bundeswehr Hamburg
https://iversity.org/c/31?r=6bd45

From Bugatti Veyron to Volkswagen Beetle, from racing to passenger car: Learn how they corner and drift, under- and over-steer!

About this course
The mobility has influenced many areas of a human's life since the invention of the wheel. While, in the early days of motorized vehicles, technical developments concentrated on simple mechanical or electrical issues , in the past decades, the electronics and with it, the microprocessor technology have become a central part of innovation in vehicles. Future developments of trendsetting style will be the conversion of the drive train from purely internal combustion engine to hybrid or alternative powertrain systems, the car-to-car communication and the autonomous vehicles. Challenges that make these technical developments partly necessary, come from a desirable reduction in CO2 emissions and an increase in the active safety. To understand the recent developments, especially in the field of alternative propulsion strategies and also in the area of autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicles, a knowledge of the basic driving physics is essential, as these innovations can be understood solely as the underlying laws of physics are known.
For this reason three parts of the vehicle dynamics, the longitudinal, the lateral and the vertical dynamics are important.
Cornering
In this second part lateral dynamic aspects of vehicles will be illuminated, that means the cornering of a car will be explained.
We will start with a simple single-track model, then we will describe the slip angle of a wheel. The slip angle results in cornering forces, which are essential for understanding lateral dynamics. After that, we will look at the dependency between longitudinal and lateral forces using Kamm’s circle and Krempel’s diagram. Then we will illuminate steady state cornering, stability and the influence of different weight distributions between inner and outer side wheels of the car. The course will be finished by two applications from automotive mechatronics.
Course Structure
  1. Single Track Model
  2. Slip Angle
  3. Cornering Force
  4. Kamm's Circle, Krempel's Diagram
  5. Steady State Cornering
  6. Stability
  7. Influence of Left/Right Weights
  8. Application: ESP, DSC
Learning Outcomes
  • You will understand basic principles of cornering of a car
  • You will know slip angle and cornering forces
  • You understand the single track model
  • You understand the steady state cornering, stability and the influence of different weight distribution between inner and outer side of the car
  • You are able to calculate simple properties of a car
Workload
Per week: 135 - 260 min.
  • one video divided in 5 to 7 portions: 45 min.
  • 5 – 7 question-clusters for knowledge: 20 -30 min.
  • 2 – 3 question-clusters for comprehension: 25 – 50 min.
  • Guided calculation for application
  • P2P-problems to train analysis and synthesis skills: 45 min.
  • wrap-up: 0 – 90 min. (depends on your previous knowledge and your comprehension) Preparation of the exam: 30 h
Course Format
The course uses a mixture of Screencasts (with handwritten derivations, drawings, formulas), Powerpoint slides and videos from real cars, simulated cars and testrigs.
Assessments
To assess the different levels of learning this course will use different form of assessments:
  • Knowledge: Multiple choice,
  • Comprehension: correlation between statements and parts of diagrams, formulas or driving maneuver (visualized by short simulation videos);
  • Application: short guided calculations (open office),
  • Analysis: P2P-problems: longer calculations or drawings
Prior Knowledge
You should have been successful in university courses in basic mathematics and in basic engineering mechanics, especially you need:
  • Algebra
  • Trigonometric Functions
  • Differential calculus
  • Linear Algebra: Vectors, Coordinate systems etc.
  • Force, Torque, Equilibrium
  • Mass, Center of Gravity, Moment of Inertia
  • Method of Sections, Friction, Newton's Law
  • (Lagrange’s Transf., Stability, ODE)

Vehicle Dynamics I: Accelerating and Braking

By Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Martin Meywerk - Professor for Automotive Engineering at the Helmut-Schmidt-University in Hamburg

https://iversity.org/c/30?r=6bd45

From Bugatti Veyron to Volkswagen Beetle, from racing to passenger car: Learn here how they speed-up and slow-down! 
About this course
The mobility has influenced many areas of a human's life since the invention of the wheel. While, in the early days of motorized vehicles, technical developments concentrated on simple mechanical or electrical issues , in the past decades, the electronics and with it, the microprocessor technology have become a central part of innovation in vehicles. Future developments of trendsetting style will be the conversion of the drive train from purely internal combustion engine to hybrid or alternative powertrain systems, the car-to-car communication and the autonomous vehicles. Challenges that make these technical developments partly necessary, come from a desirable reduction in CO2 emissions and an increase in the active safety. To understand the recent developments, especially in the field of alternative propulsion strategies and also in the area of autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicles, knowledge of the basic driving physics is essential, as these innovations can be understood solely as the underlying laws of physics are known.
For this reason three parts of the vehicle dynamics, the longitudinal, the lateral and the vertical dynamics are important.
Acceleration and Braking
In this first part longitudinal dynamic aspects of vehicles will be illuminated.
Clear and brief: acceleration and braking
In Detail: After an introduction we will look at driving resistances and slip, we will explain the demand of power and limits of a car, then we will clarify the needs for clutch and gear and we will look at the rear and front weights during acceleration and braking. The course will be finished by two applications from automotive mechatronics.
Course Structure
  1. Introduction
  2. Driving Resistance
  3. Slip
  4. Power Demand, Limits
  5. Clutch, Gearbox
  6. Front/Rear Weights
  7. Application: Anti-Lock Braking System
  8. Application: Recovery of energy
Learning Outcomes
  • You will understand basic principles of accelerating and braking a car
  • You will know the driving resistances and their influences to vehicle dynamics
  • You understand the discrepancy between demands and limits of powertrain
  • You understand the necessity of gears and clutch
  • You understand the correlation between braking, wheel load and recovery of energy
  • You are able to calculate simple properties of a car
Workload
Per week: 135 - 260 min.
  • one video divided in 5 to 7 portions: 45 min.
  • 5 – 7 question-clusters for knowledge: 20 -30 min.
  • 2 – 3 question-clusters for comprehension: 25 – 50 min.
  • Guided calculation for application
  • P2P-problems to train analysis and synthesis skills: 45 min.
  • wrap-up: 0 – 90 min. (depends on your previous knowledge and your comprehension) Preparation of the exam: 30 h
Course Format
The course uses a mixture of Screencasts (with handwritten derivations, drawings, formulas), Powerpoint slides and videos from real cars, simulated cars and testrigs.
Assessments
To assess the different levels of learning this course will use different form of assessments:
  • Knowledge: Multiple choice,
  • Comprehension: correlation between statements and parts of diagrams, formulas or driving maneuver (visualized by short simulation videos);
  • Application: short guided calculations (open office),
  • Analysis: P2P-problems: longer calculations or drawings
Prior Knowledge
You should have been successful in university courses in basic mathematics and in basic engineering mechanics, especially you need:
  • Algebra
  • Trigonometric Functions
  • Differential calculus
  • Linear Algebra: Vectors, Coordinate systems etc.
  • Force, Torque, Equilibrium
  • Mass, Center of Gravity, Moment of Inertia
  • Method of Sections, Friction, Newton's Law
  • (Lagrange's Equation)

Modelling and Simulation using MATLAB® - Free online courses by German University Professors

By Prof. Dr.-Ing. Georg Fries https://iversity.org/c/13?r=6bd45

Professor of Digital Signal Processing, Department of Engineering, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, Wiesbaden

How can I build a robot, construct a space station on Mars or realize an adventurous new business venture? There can be no progress or innovation without modelling and simulation. Now you can learn how to design, prove and plan just about everything.
About this course
Technical progress wouldn’t be possible without modelling and simulation. They are starting point and basis in most cases of research and development. Modelling and simulation make a particular part or feature of the world easier to define, visualize, quantify and understand. Both require identifying and selecting relevant aspects of a situation in the real world and then using different types of models for different aims and defining the best fitting model parameters.
MATLAB is a high-level programming language and an environment for numerical computation and visualization. You can analyse data and create models for a wide range of applications, including signal processing and communications, image and video processing, control engineering and computational finance.
In this course you will learn the basics of modelling and simulation from an interdisciplinary perspective. In addition, we will teach you how to develop models using MALTAB and the block diagram environment Simulink.
Why this MOOC is interdisciplinary
Scientific disciplines have their own ideas about specific types of modelling. Such as conceptual models to better understand the subject, graphical models to visualize the subject, operational models to operationalize and mathematical models to quantify the subject. In this course, our experts from three disciplines look at modelling concepts from various angles:
  • Technological view
  • Economic perspective
  • Importance of knowledge management.
Course Contents
The course is divided in two sections. The first part (A) teaches the basics and is mandatory to all participants. Within the second part of the course (B) you have the opportunity to choose from a catalogue of applications (MOOClets) to work on selected examples.
Part A – Interdisciplinary Introduction to modelling and simulation
  • Modelling
  • Simulation
  • Introduction to MATLAB concepts
  • Building a business case
  • Methods to solve formal problems
  • Knowledge management
  • Introduction to Simulink
Part B – Selectable Applications of modelling and simulation (MOOClets)
You can choose three to five applications according to your preference and knowledge from the following catalogue:
  • Simulation of a water treatment plant
  • Application 'modelling a business base'
  • Application 'knowledge management'
  • Control engineering I – 'controlling Lego® NXT robots'
  • Control engineering II – 'line tracking with Lego® Segway'
  • Control engineering III – 'a Segway – how does it work?'
  • Image processing I – ‘statistics for image processing and machine learning’
  • Image processing II – 'a brief introduction to image processing'
  • Image processing III – ‘application of machine learning algorithms in a nutshell'
  • Quality measurement of video cameras (lenses and sensors)
  • Acoustic simulation of musical instruments
  • … (further chapters are planned)
Learning with the MOOC
During the term of the MOOC we will offer video lectures that convey modelling and simulation step by step in a descriptive way. You will exercise the issues in interactive tasks and weekly homework.
The MOOC platform is a networking tool. You can benefit from the peer-to-peer learning and the forum within the course. While not required, we recommend creating learning groups and to engage in the community.
Experimentation and playful learning are part of the MOOC.
Learning Outcomes
  • Students are acquainted with the concepts of modelling and simulation from an interdisciplinary point of view
  • Students are able to implement and simulate models using MATLAB/Simulink
  • Depending on the selected applications in part B of the course students get deeper know how in control engineering, image processing, machine learning, business case modelling, knowledge management and simulation of a water treatment plant.
  • Enthusiastic students with only simple programming knowledge get an understanding of the basic MATLAB programming.
Prior Knowledge
Mathematics and physics knowledge of secondary level education and programming knowledge are recommended.
Workload
  • Approx. 8-12 hours per week.
  • 12 Units including individual selected applications of Part B.
  • Experimentation and a deeper look at the topics as you like.